How to easily root your android device


How to easily root an Android device

Without waisting much time we just need to follow the step by step instructions below, bit before that we need to Note that our phone must be fully charged or at least the phone should make sure the phone is charged to 70% level.


Step 1: Download and install KingoRoot for Windows, making sure to leave unchecked the option to "Install Yahoo powered Chromium browser" and then click Decline to prevent any other adware incursions.

Step 2: Enable USB debugging mode on your phone. If it's running Android 4.0 or 4.1, tap Settings, Developer Options, then tick the box for "USB debugging." (You may need to switch "Developer options" to On before you can do so.) On Android 4.2, tap Settings, About Phone, Developer Options, and then tick USB debugging." Then tap OK to approve the setting change.

On Android 4.3 and later (including 5.0, though this also applies to some versions of 4.2), tap Settings, About Phone, then scroll down to Build Number. Tap it seven times, at which point you should see the message, "You are now a developer!"

With that done, tap Settings, About Phone, Developer Options, and then tick USB debugging." Then tap OK to approve the setting change.

Step 3: Run Android Root on your PC, then connect your phone via its USB sync cable. After a moment, the former should show a connection to the latter. Your device screen may show an "Allow USB debugging?" pop-up. Tick "Always allow from this computer," then tap OK.

Step 4: Click Root, then sit back and wait while the utility does its thing. After a few minutes, my Galaxy S6 got to 70 percent, and then the phone once again crashed and rebooted. Again, your mileage can (and most likely will) vary.

And that's all there is to it. If you decide you want to reverse the process, just run Android Root again, connect your phone, then click Remove Root. (Same goes for the app version, more or less.)

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